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Locomotive poem by Polish-Jewish writer Julian Tuwim was for the first time illustrated with pinhole photography. Join us at one of our events and get a free copy of the book! The event is designed for children age 3-7. Participants have an opportunity to make their own trains, learn and sing a Locomotive song , read the story using a gigantic book and make the various sounds to imitate the sounds of a train. Every child receives a free copy of the book.

Locomotive family event at Topolski Century, 150-152 Hungerford Arches, SE1 8XU London, January 16th 12-1 & 1-2 pm

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The pinhole photography exhibition at the Menier Gallery in London on 10-15th January 2011. Artists Marta Kotlarska, Anna Udowicka and Curator Olga Glazik from Polish group Click Academy (Akademia Pstryk) who have collaborated with a group of Polish young people living in London in order to prepare illustrations for Julian Tuwim's Locomotive poem.

Locomotive pinhole exhibition by Click Academy

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The latest solution which intends to build bridges between young people of different backgrounds. Project The Locomotive by Click Academy will involve 33 young people working together using an unusual technique called pinhole photography to produce a bilingual, professionally-printed picture book of Polish-Jewish poet Julian Tuwim's famous "Locomotive" poem for children.

Locomotive project

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Locomotive project

The history of the Jews in Poland dates back over a millennium. Poland was home to the largest and most significant Jewish community in Europe. Poland served as the centre for their culture, starting from a long period of religious tolerance and prosperity among Polish Jewish population, to its nearly complete genocide destruction by Nazi Germany in the 20th century after the German and Soviet occupation of Poland in 1939 and the ensuing Holocaust. Jews were big contributors to all fields of Polish culture including science, sport and art.

The Jewish cultural scene was particularly vibrant in pre-World War II Poland with numerous Jewish publications and over 116 periodicals. The Jewish authors of the period, among them Julian Tuwim, made important contributions to Polish literature. In Poland, generations of children are reading the classic Tuwim's children's poem "Locomotive". It is a funny and amusing story about a train written in beautiful, poetic language.

Project The Locomotive by Click Academy will involve 33 young people working together using an unusual technique called pinhole photography to produce a bilingual, professionally-printed picture book of Polish-Jewish poet Julian Tuwim's famous "Locomotive" poem for children. The book is aimed at helping Polish children aged 4-7 to adapt to the British educational system. To create illustrations to the poem the group will construct handmade photo cameras.

The young people will then organize and run a series of creative outreach events including a travelling exhibition, internet promotion, public readings and teacher training workshops.

The book and its outreach events aim to show a positive picture of Polish and Jewish people and richness of their culture, demonstrating the similarities and celebrating the differences. The project's idea came from consulting 40 teenagers attending a Polish Saturday school in Camden.

The project is financially supported by MediaBox, Embassy of the Republic of Poland and Polish Culture Institute in London.


If you would like to be to be involved helping us to deliver any of the project activities please feel free to contact Olga Glazik, olga.glazik@ClickAcademy.co.uk

Marta Kotlarska mkotlarska@ClickAcademy.co.uk

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